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EXPERIENCE THE PUREST FORM OF
FREE FLIGHT THE FUN AND SAFE WAY!
HANG GLIDING  INSTRUCTION, TANDEM FLIGHTS,  
GLIDERS & EQUIPMENT SALES AND FREE-FLIGHT EXCURSIONS
THROUGHOUT OREGON AND  BEYOND

-AUTHORIZED WILLS WING DEALER-

PO Box 2128   Grants Pass, OR  97528   Phone/Fax: 541-772-2915
Email: info@soair.net
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (continued)

Q. I've seen people floating around by what looks like a parachute.
Is that a hang glider?
A.  No.  What you're seeing is probably a paraglider, which is
completely different from a hang glider.  Unlike a paraglider, a
hang glider has a rigid frame that prevents it from collapsing in
unstable conditions. (which occur more frequently than you might
think!).  Because of their structure, hang gliders are a more efficient wing and can glide faster & farther than
paragliders given the same conditions.

Q. Don't you need a lot of wind to fly a hang glider?
A. This is actually a very common misconception.  Hang gliders can be flown in conditions ranging from zero
to thirty or more mile-per-hour winds.  This is another difference between hang gliders and paragliders.  You
will often see hang gliders & paragliders flying together in light or no wind, but when the wind picks up to 15
mph or more (which is frequent at our local sites), the paragliders
are usually packing up & going home while hang gliders keep on flying.

Q. What do you do if something goes wrong up there?
A. If you've performed a proper pre-flight inspection (which you should
do before every flight), then the chances of something going wrong while
you are in the air are slim.  In the unlikely event, however, all pilots who
fly at altitude are required to carry a reserve parachute.

Q. How high, far, fast, and long can you fly?
A. In lift conditions, you can fly as long and far as you want.  One hour or
more is an average flight on a good day, but many pilots stay up longer.  
The current cross country record is 475 miles.  The FAA limits the altitude you can fly to 18,000 ft., and many
pilots have reached that ceiling.  The speed range for hang gliders is from around 16 mph to over 100 mph,
depending upon the performance level of the design.
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